Navya Finds Promising Response Received from Women with Early-stage Breast Cancer

Treatment Option and Patient Preferences Keys to Decision Making for Emotional Well Being – Presented at San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS) – December 7, 2018


CAMBRIDGE, Mass. and SAN ANTONIO, Texas and Mumbai, INDIA – Dec. 7, 2018 – Navya, a clinical informatics and cancer patient services company, founded by graduates of Harvard, MIT Sloan and Stanford in conjunction with Tata Memorial Centre (TMC) and National Cancer Grid (NCG), has been invited to present this impactful study at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS).

Navya’s patented system uses clinical informatics, predictive analytics and machine learning. These technologies, which were validated with clinical experts and presented at SABCS 2014, provide patients an upper hand to assess a cancer care decision for themselves, while making available an easy, quick, and preliminary treatment decision pathway, based on an evidence and experience based system, thereby relieving patient anxiety. These are key features of the study being presented at this year’s SABCS.

Promising results have been obtained from patients who have used the Navya Online Expert Opinion System, having been provided with evidence and experience based preliminary reports and expert opinions.

Dr. Shalaka Joshi is presenting, Accuracy of psychosocial assessment in an online surgical decision aid developed for early breast cancer patients with resource and educational constraints” – Friday, December 7, 2018, 5-7pm.

Navya’s presentation focuses on the good response which has been received from women with early-stage breast cancer using the Navya Patient Preference Tool (PPT), which consists of an easy to understand questionnaire, making it simple to understand complex surgical treatment decisions. Women from socioeconomic backgrounds with resource constraints are commonly not explained the options they have, and hence allowed only limited opinion in their treatment decision making.

“Every patient should be able to advocate her own treatment decisions,” stated Dr. Rajendra Badwe, Director of Tata Memorial Centre and Principal Investigator of the Randomized Controlled Trial on Navya Patient Preference Tools. “By using the Navya PPT, women are able to assess risk-benefit tradeoffs and determine their decision irrespective of education and resource constraints, along with their family and treating oncologist. Decision Aids such as Navya PPT, which account for psychosocial confounders of agency, have the potential to benefit women otherwise marginalized from shared decision making and is especially relevant for women to enable them to be a party to the decision making on matters related to their health and their body.”

About Tata Memorial Centre
Tata Memorial Centre, founded in 1941, leads the Indian subcontinent in cancer care by evidence based practice of oncology, and research and services which are affordable, innovative, and relevant to the needs of the country.   Every year nearly 10 million patients visit TMC from all over India and developing countries in Asia, Africa. Approximately, 70 percent of these patients are treated almost free of charge. Visit: https://tmc.gov.in.

About Navya
In 2009, Navya was founded in Cambridge, MA by graduates of Harvard, MIT Sloan, and Stanford.  Navya’s patented system uses clinical informatics, predictive analytics and machine learning technologies. It combines several clinical information sources as inputs – and outputs a treatment decision most applicable to a unique patient.  For the first time, quick and affordable access to evidence and experience based expert treatment decisions is available to every cancer patient. Navya’s Online Expert Opinion Service has been used by over 26,000 patients in 67 countries.
Visit: Navya Online
Navya Twitter   Navya Facebook   Navya LinkedIn

Contact:

Tracy Wemett

BroadPR

+1-617-868-5031

tracy@broadpr.com

All trademarks recognized.

#

Navya Achieves Reduction in Patient Anxiety with 24 Hour Response Time for Cancer Treatment Options

Treatment Option Response Time and Patient Preferences Key to Decision Making and Emotional Well Being – Presented at San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS) – December 6-7, 2018

Navya Press Release img1

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. and SAN ANTONIO, Texas and Mumbai, INDIA – Dec. 6, 2018 – Navya, a clinical informatics and cancer patient services company, founded by graduates of Harvard, MIT Sloan and Stanford in conjunction with Tata Memorial Centre (TMC) and National Cancer Grid (NCG), has been invited to present two clinical impact studies at the prestigious San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS).

The first presentation focuses on a study that reveals providing preliminary reports with treatment recommendations within one day of testing relieves patient anxiety by over 97 percent. The second presentation outlines a study that shows easy-to-understand reports and options for complex treatment allows easier patient decision making. Both studies show the importance of ensuring the emotional well-being of patients and families.

WHAT:  Navya at SABCS 2018:

WHERE: Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, San Antonio, Texas, USA

Navya’s patented system uses clinical informatics, predictive analytics and machine learning. These technologies, which were validated with clinical experts and presented at SABCS 2014, provide patients an upper hand to assess a cancer care decision for themselves, while making available an easy, quick, and preliminary treatment decision pathway, based on an evidence and experience based system, thereby relieving patient anxiety. These are key features of the study being presented at this year’s SABCS.

Promising results have been obtained from patients who have used the Navya Online Expert Opinion System, having been provided with evidence and experience based preliminary reports and expert opinions.

Dr. Naresh Ramarajan, Chief Medical Officer of Navya, said, “System based preliminary reports sent to the patient at a median time of 3.37 hours has proven beneficial, resulting in a 90 percent time savings in comparison to subsequent review by experts. In 10 percent of the preliminary reports, experts added information such as de-/escalating treatment, and additional diagnostic tests.”

Analyzing impact on patients, Dr. Ramarajan added: “Providing preliminary reports with a treatment recommendation within one day, relieves patient anxiety by over 97 percent.  However, even a one day delay, increases patient anxiety by over 15 percent. Therefore, each day in waiting matters.”

Over 83 percent of patients who were unrelieved with a three day turnaround, stated that it would matter to them to receive the treatment recommendation in one day. Of note, top academic cancer hospitals in the United States that provide online second opinions have an average turnaround time of 7-14 days. In most developing countries, there is no option to receive a second opinion from tertiary care centers.

Navya’s second presentation focuses on the good response which has been received from women with early-stage breast cancer using the Navya Patient Preference Tool (PPT), which consists of an easy to understand questionnaire, making it simple to understand complex surgical treatment decisions.

Women from socioeconomic backgrounds with resource constraints are commonly not explained the options they have, and hence allowed only limited opinion in their treatment decision making.

“Every patient should be able to advocate her own treatment decisions,” stated Dr. Rajendra Badwe, Director of Tata Memorial Centre and Principal Investigator of the Randomized Controlled Trial on Navya Patient Preference Tools. “By using the Navya PPT, women are able to assess risk-benefit tradeoffs and determine their decision irrespective of education and resource constraints, along with their family and treating oncologist. Decision Aids such as Navya PPT, which account for psychosocial confounders of agency, have the potential to benefit women otherwise marginalized from shared decision making and is especially relevant for women to enable them to be a party to the decision making on matters related to their health and their body.”

About Tata Memorial Centre                                                                  

Tata Memorial Centre, founded in 1941, leads the Indian subcontinent in cancer care by evidence based practice of oncology, and research and services which are affordable, innovative, and relevant to the needs of the country.   Every year nearly 10 million patients visit TMC from all over India and developing countries in Asia, Africa. Approximately, 70 percent of these patients are treated almost free of charge.Visit: https://tmc.gov.in

About Navya                                                                                     

In 2009, Navya was founded in Cambridge, MA by graduates of Harvard, MIT Sloan, and Stanford.  Navya’s patented system uses clinical informatics, predictive analytics and machine learning technologies. It combines several clinical information sources as inputs – and outputs a treatment decision most applicable to a unique patient.  For the first time, quick and affordable access to evidence and experience based expert treatment decisions is available to every cancer patient. Navya’s Online Expert Opinion Service has been used by over 26,000 patients in 67 countries.
Visit:  https://company.navya.care/

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/navyacare
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/NavyaNetwork?ref=hl
LinkedIn:  https://www.linkedin.com/company/navya-network/

Contact:

Tracy Wemett

BroadPR

+1-617-868-5031

tracy@broadpr.com

All trademarks recognized.

#

Study Reveals Providing Preliminary Reports Within One Day Relieves Patient Anxiety

Treatment Option Response Time Key to Patients Emotional Well Being – Presented at San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS) – December 6-7, 2018

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. and SAN ANTONIO, Texas and Mumbai, INDIA – Dec. 6, 2018 – Navya, a clinical informatics and cancer patient services company, founded by graduates of Harvard, MIT Sloan and Stanford in conjunction with Tata Memorial Centre (TMC) and National Cancer Grid (NCG), has been invited to present this impactful study at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS).

Dr. Naresh Ramarajan, Navya’s Chief Medical Officer, will be presenting, Responding at patient’s time of need: Scaling rapid access to evidence based treatment plan” Thursday, December 6, 2018, 5-7pm.  Program Number:  P3-16-01at this years SABCS. This presentation focuses on a study that reveals providing preliminary reports with treatment recommendations within one day of testing relieves patient anxiety by over 97 percent.

Navya’s patented system uses clinical informatics, predictive analytics and machine learning. These technologies, which were validated with clinical experts and presented at SABCS 2014, provide patients an upper hand to assess a cancer care decision for themselves, while making available an easy, quick, and preliminary treatment decision pathway, based on an evidence and experience based system, thereby relieving patient anxiety.

Dr. Naresh Ramarajan said, “System based preliminary reports sent to the patient at a median time of 3.37 hours has proven beneficial, resulting in a 90 percent time savings in comparison to subsequent review by experts. In 10 percent of the preliminary reports, experts added information such as de-/escalating treatment, and additional diagnostic tests.”

Analyzing impact on patients, Dr. Ramarajan added: “Providing preliminary reports with a treatment recommendation within one day, relieves patient anxiety by over 97 percent.  However, even a one day delay, increases patient anxiety by over 15 percent. Therefore, each day in waiting matters.”

About Dr. Naresh Ramarajan
Dr.  Naresh Ramarajan is an American board certified internist and emergency physician.  His research is in medical decision making and clinical informatics, in which he is also board certified.  Dr.  Ramarajan is the founder of Navya, an organization that empowers cancer patients and oncologists around the world with on-time access to evidence and experience based expertise.

About Tata Memorial Centre
Tata Memorial Centre, founded in 1941, leads the Indian subcontinent in cancer care by evidence based practice of oncology, and research and services which are affordable, innovative, and relevant to the needs of the country.   Every year nearly 10 million patients visit TMC from all over India and developing countries in Asia, Africa. Approximately, 70 percent of these patients are treated almost free of charge. Visit: https://tmc.gov.in.

About Navya
In 2009, Navya was founded in Cambridge, MA by graduates of Harvard, MIT Sloan, and Stanford.  Navya’s patented system uses clinical informatics, predictive analytics and machine learning technologies. It combines several clinical information sources as inputs – and outputs a treatment decision most applicable to a unique patient.  For the first time, quick and affordable access to evidence and experience based expert treatment decisions is available to every cancer patient. Navya’s Online Expert Opinion Service has been used by over 26,000 patients in 67 countries.
Visit: Navya Online Navya Twitter Navya Facebook Navya LinkedIn

Contact:

Tracy Wemett

BroadPR

+1-617-868-5031

tracy@broadpr.com

All trademarks recognized.

#

Two Distinct States of Mind

As a young medical student, I saw a person dying. Fluid was filling his lungs as a heart valve had ruptured from a massive heart attack a few days earlier. I did not have the ability to save his life where I was working — no immediate ICU or surgical care was available. It struck me later that I had the choice of disclosure. Should I have told him and his wife that he was dying? Would there have been a few minutes of “I love yous” and goodbyes? Or, would ensuing panic be all that remained etched as the last few memories?

Working in the developing world, non-disclosure to the patient, and their right to not know all about their healthcare is the default. Patients entrust decision making and autonomy to their family members, and many times, they are implicitly aware that they are not fully in the loop. Families also do not want diagnoses of terminal illness disclosed to patients. The enduring belief is that this will shorten their life and remove potential for happiness. In cultures accustomed to death at any age, dying is seldom discussed. It often happens, at home, with family, silently, without much accompanying discussion.

It has always struck a chord with me that the dying are aware that they are passing away. The ebb of the body’s energy is not mistaken at the end of times for something else. Spoken or not, it is implicit in every interaction.

In cultures accustomed to death at any age, dying is seldom discussed.

Yet, friends often describe a loved one’s passing from cancer as “sudden” or “unexpected”. “He was doing fine”- in the house in bed, or in the hospital ward, until he fell sick and passed in a matter of days. Despite a terminal diagnosis of advanced refractory cancer, the story that is told is one of death arriving without a warning.

I believe that there are two distinct states of mind— one of caregiving, and the other of grieving. These cannot coexist easily. The caregiver, even the self, nurtures the past and hopes for the future, since the present is intolerable. The grieved, instead lives solely in the past, and rewrites history to make sense of the powerlessness to change the future.

Physicians struggle with this. As a patient transitions from curative to comfort driven measures, they raise the specter of disclosure, of poor prognosis and impending death, as a way to absolve themselves of any guilt, any way to impact the future. Rarely, this is needed in the developing world. As a gross generalization, bucket lists are the privilege of the healthy and wealthy. Otherwise, many families are already together, at home, with their loved ones, in the non-medicalized ritual of dying that is as ancient as our cultures.

What is forgotten is that no one knows the future. We play with probabilities and pretend that they are certainties. The removal of hope for families and self leaves very little to get through the everyday with. Much has been written about living a pain free day, the taste of something special, or watching a grandchild at play. But there is also the balm of improbable hope, balanced with measured, comfort providing interventions, that allow family and patient to weather the present.

There will always be time for grieving. I am now beginning to see the wisdom of not starting that process while our loved ones are still with us.

-Dr. Naresh Ramarajan

 

Online Expert Opinion: www.Navya.Care

Tata Trusts: www.tatatrusts.org

Tata Memorial Center: www.tmc.gov.in

Navya: www.NavyaNetwork.com

La Médecine C’est Guérir Parfois, Sulager Souvent, Consoler Toujours

A friend approached me today. His mom is ebbing away with one of the most primal challenges — losing her ability to breathe. A tumor grows around her vocal cords, constricting her ability to eat, or swallow her saliva, or breathe – while her mind works and shuts down internally into depression and despair.

‘’La médecine c’est guérir parfois, soulager souvent, consoler toujours’

This medieval French admonition to doctors is to ‘Cure occasionally, relieve often, comfort always’

Much of my experience with patients is one where they are more terrified of what doctors will do to them in pursuit of an often elusive cure. We have invented many novel methods of torture in the pursuit of life – and apply them indiscriminately in response to fears, anxiety, guilt and shame; both ours and the families’.

Over some time, we uncovered that his mom doesn’t want treatments. She wants to feel more comfortable. Lessening the tidal wave of fear of choking was the only comfort that made sense to offer.

I tinkered around with some solutions — cool humidified mist, thickened fluids, a touch of benzodiazepines to allay anxiety. We also talked about music, prayer, family, and food for taste or comfort rather than nourishment.

Where is our calling and ability to minister to those dying from our incurable maladies?

Palliative and supportive care medicine is just now reaching some recognition in most of the world. The Indian Supreme Court ruled recently that a person’s right to dignity and privacy included a natural death in a course of their choosing.

As the technology to cure improves, so must our resolve to releave and comfort those beyond our means.

I am eager to expand Navya’s palliative recommendations, especially in settings where we die suffering without any help or comfort. The full spectrum of care must include the ability to recognize a patient’s dignity and preferences, and to comfort – always.

-Dr. Naresh Ramarajan

 

Online Expert Opinion: navyanetwork.com/tmh

Tata Trusts: tatatrusts.org

Tata Memorial Center: tmc.gov.in

Navya: www.navya.care

Navya Scales Access to Rare Cancer Care Expertise and Tailors Evidence-based Treatment Plans to Individuals Based on Affordability and Access to Therapies

Navya Press Release img1

Navya Presents Joint Study with National Comprehensive Cancer Network at San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, December 5-9, 2017

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. and SAN ANTONIO, Texas – Dec. 8, 2017 – “TMC NCG Navya Online” (Navya) has scaled access to rare cancer care expertise, tailoring evidence based treatment plans to individuals based on affordability and access to therapies. Navya, a clinical informatics system and online expert opinion service, provides evidence based multidisciplinary expert opinions within 24 hours to thousands of cancer patients around the world. Navya learns from evidence, prior tumor board decisions and quick review from expert oncologists to recommend tailored treatment plans to patients at all levels of affordability.

A joint study presented at San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium on December 8, 2017 by National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) and Navya demonstrated that 88.3 percent of Navya’s treatment decisions mapped to NCCN’s Resource Stratified Framework (NCCN-RSF) for Lower Middle Income Countries (LMIC).

Navya is sensitive to the needs of resource constrained patients.  Expert oncologists from Tata Memorial Centre (TMC) – one of Asia’s largest tertiary cancer centers, and National Cancer Grid (NCG) – a consortium of 108 cancer centers and specialty centers in India, provide online opinions to patients via Navya.

In most of the world, the cancer burden is disproportionately greater than the scarce access to tumor board expertise.  Patients often do not receive evidence based treatment plans. Further, patients are resource constrained and are unable to afford or access therapies that are optimal per global guidelines like NCCN.

Since its creation in 2015, over 17,000 patients from 22 LMIC’s have reached out to TMC NCG Navya Online to receive an online expert opinion.

Dr. Ben Andersonvice chair of the NCCN Breast Panel and chair of the NCCN International Program Committee and the senior author of the study said, “While there is significant drug discovery and treatment  research happening worldwide to combat cancer, the therapies are often unviable to LMIC. Tailoring treatment plans to patient constraints is critical and Navya’s online expert opinion service does that in a scalable manner.”

Dr. Rajendra Badwe, Director of Tata Memorial Centre, stated, “In India and low and middle income countries, patients are challenged to receive evidence based therapies within available resources. NCCN-Resource Stratified Guidelines is an attempt by a globally reputable standard of care organization to determine treatment pathways based on resources.  This study shows that only 8.6 percent of parent NCCN guidelines could be mapped directly to patient care in India.  Additionally, 79.7 percent required tailoring for resource constraints, and even so 11.7 percent of guidelines did not map.  There are several expert practices in India that are not yet included in the global guidelines.  For instance, unlike TMC’s clinical practice, NCCN-RSF does not recommend shorter courses of expensive targeted therapies like Trastuzumab for patients who cannot afford year-long therapy.  Our informatics system captures and disperses such expertise to resource constrained patients nationwide.  NCCN can scale adoption and learning of resource constrained treatment guidelines by leveraging on the ground systems.”

Dr. Naresh Ramarajan, Founder of Navya and Chief Medical Officer further stated, “Navya’s vision is to transform delivery of cancer expertise to impact cancer care at a global level. This study shows that the informatics based system and online service is scalable and individualized to each patient’s condition and constraints. Expanding the reach of this service across the developing world can maximize outcomes for financially underprivileged patients.”

National Cancer Grid (NCG), tmc.gov.in/ncg Tata Memorial Centre (TMC) tmc.gov.in

The NCG is a consortium of 108 cancer centers, with a mandate to standardize cancer care, nationally. NCG is the largest global network of cancer centers collaborating to use technology and training to bring cancer expertise to every oncologist and cancer patient in India. TMC is Asia’s largest leading tertiary care expert cancer center, seeing over 67,000 cancer patients every year. Its strength necessitates a responsibility to make its expertise available to patients across India and developing countries, especially those who reside in locations where there are no expert cancer care centers.

Navya www.navya.info

Navya is a clinical informatics and patient services organization with a unique understanding of cancer patients and oncologists and a core commitment to cancer care. With a proven track record of successfully implementing innovative solutions that are low cost and effective, Navya is the first to develop technology systems specific to Indian cancer data for use by cancer patients and oncologists in India.

Twitter: https://twitter.com/NavyaCare
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NavyaNetwork/
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/15236089

Contact:  Gitika Srivastava | gitika@post.harvard.edu